After the bouquet has been flung, it’s time for the lads to get their hands dirty over the garter. This is another opportunity to heighten the festivities and introduce a new dynamic to the reception. However, like the bouquet toss, the garter toss isn’t for everyone. Let’s take a look at some of the pros and cons of the garter toss, and how to make it work for your particular wedding crowd.

If your male friends are keen for a bit of a scrum, then have the toss. It will make for great pictures – if there are no black eyes or bloody noses, of course. Entice more reluctant guests to participate by attaching some cash to the garter, like a fifty dollar note. That’ll definitely get them off their chairs and into the action!

The garter ceremony does come with its fair share of logistical hiccups. Indeed, you don’t want dodgy photographs of hubby fidgeting up your skirt for the garter while you look on, beetroot-faced. It’s important, then, to stick to these basic garter toss rules.

1. Always be seated for the removal of the garter.
2. Manoeuver the garter to your knee from the thigh. Not only will this preserve a bit of modesty, but it will make your husband’s job of removing it much easier.
3. If that is still a bit too risqué for you, then take off the garter yourself and give it to hubby by hand.

If the chaps aren’t inclined to go running after a small ringlet of frilly lace, then substitute the garter toss with something else. A popular alternative is a couple’s “dance-off” competition. Married couples are invited to take to the dance floor for the first song of the contest. They are then eliminated according to how many years they’ve been married for. The longest married couple win the competition, and take both the garter and bridal bouquet as prizes.

It’s up to you to assess your guests, and determine which event will suit them best. The best approach will guarantee that the garter toss is anything but a flop.

By